Suicide rates in girls are rising, study finds, especially in those age 10 to 14

Suicide rates in girls are rising, study finds, especially in those age 10 to 14

Suicide rates in girls are rising, study finds, especially in those age 10 to 14

Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in in Columbus, Ohio analyzed suicide rates of US kids and teens ages 10 to 19 between 1975 and 2016 using the Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research database, run by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In that period, there were more than 85,000 suicides in kids and teens, with 80% in boys and 20% in girls. The rates of suicide peaked in 1993 and had been on the decline until 2007, when they again started to climb, according to the findings, published Friday in JAMA.

Although boys were 3.8 times more likely than girls to kill themselves over the 40-year study period, the gap is rapidly narrowing. Starting in 2007, the rates of suicide for girls 10 to 14 increased 12.7% per year, compared with 7.1% for boys the same age. A similar trend was seen for teens 15 to 19, with rates of suicide going up 7.9% for girls and 3.5% for boys.

Boys 15 to 19 continued to take their own lives using firearms at far greater rates than girls, but the rates of hanging and suffocation in girls approached those of boys.

More young people, especially girls, are attempting suicide by poisoning, study says

Suicide is the second leading cause of death in kids and teens ages 10 to 19 in the United States after accidents and unintentional injuries, according to the CDC. Rates of suicide have historically been higher in boys than in girls across all age groups.

Girls turning to more lethal means is cause for “great concern,” explained lead author Donna Ruch, research scientist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, adding that girls continue to attempt suicide at higher rates and the shift toward more lethal methods could have dire consequences for the rates of completed suicide in this group.

The study was not designed to determine the reasons behind the troubling trends, explained Dr. Joan Luby, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the Washington University School of Medicine, and Sarah Kertz, a clinical psychologist at Southern Illinois University, in a commentary published alongside the study in JAMA.

But given the short period of time over which the rates of suicide have spiked for young girls, Luby and Kertz point to social media as a likely contributor.

Girls may be more vulnerable to the negative effects of social media

“Compared with boys, girls use social media more frequently and are more likely to experience cyberbullying,” Luby and Kertz wrote.

Girls who are depressed also elicit more negative responses from their friends on social media than boys, they added.

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Combined, they say, these findings suggest that the negative effects of social media may be stronger on girls and may provide one explanation for why young girls are more vulnerable to suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

Yet social media may be just one piece of the puzzle.

The role of societal rules and expectations

“We know that certain societal rules and expectations for women can be associated with higher rates of mental health issues and suicide rates,” said Dr. Barbara Robles-Ramamurthy, child and adolescent psychiatrist at the Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio, who was not involved in the study. “Then you add a possible biological component — hormones — and a genetic predisposition.”

Number of children going to ER with suicidal thoughts, attempts doubles, study finds

Another reason for the rise in depression and suicidal behaviors for both boys and girls may be more stress and pressure being placed on kids, said Dr. Gene Beresin, executive director of the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who also was not involved in the study.

“Kids are feeling more pressure to achieve, more pressure in school, and are more worried about making a living than in previous years,” he said.

In isolation, none of these factors has been proven to lead to an increase in suicidal behaviors and ultimately suicide, but taken together, a pattern begins to emerge, Beresin said.

Recognizing warning signs in children and teens

Mental illness — especially when it comes to depression and anxiety — can be silent or manifest in ways parents would not expect, Robles-Ramamurthy said. In addition to sadness, depression in kids and teens can manifest as anger and irritability.

“It’s very normal for your child to start getting a little more moody and defiant,” she said of the teenage years. “But if you start seeing drastic changes, their academic performance is declining, they’re not spending as much time with family or isolating themselves, those are big red flags.”

If those behaviors are present, Robles-Ramamurthy recommends asking teens clearly whether they feel depressed or have considered hurting themselves or ending their lives. Asking these questions directly does not increase the risk of suicide, she added.

How to get help: In the United States, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. The International Association for Suicide Prevention and Befrienders Worldwide also provide contact information for crisis centers around the world.

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British people get drunk more often than anyone else, survey finds

British people get drunk more often than anyone else, survey finds

British people get drunk more often than anyone else, survey finds

The results of the 2019 Global Drug Survey, published Thursday, revealed that British respondents get drunk more times per year than people from anywhere else.

Adam Winstock, an addiction psychiatrist and founder of the Global Drug Survey, told CNN that British respondents are drinking too much, too often, regarding getting drunk as the point of a night out as opposed to enhancing the evening.

“We have never grasped moderation — it’s not part of our culture or conversation,” he said. “We need to learn that more fun with better health and fatter wallets can follow from a bit less, a bit less often.”

And drinkers around the world should consider cutting down to benefit their health, said Winstock.

“Deaths due to alcoholic liver disease and cancer due to excessive alcohol consumption are on the rise along with obesity and poorer mental health,” he said. “Drinking too much makes all these worse — drinking less make them better.”

Researchers spoke to 123,814 people from more than 30 countries in preparing the report, and they found that people on average had got drunk 33 times in the past 12 months

Results reflect the number of times that survey respondents said they got drunk, rather than the amount of alcohol consumed.

Those from English-speaking countries got drunk most often, according to the report, while participants from South American countries got drunk on the lowest number of occasions.

UK respondents said they got drunk 51 times in the past year, compared with 50 times in the US, 48 in Canada and 47 in Australia.

Chilean respondents, on the other hand, reported getting drunk just 16 times a year, and Colombians 22 times.

Some 38% of survey participants said they wanted to drink less in the next year.

The Global Drug Survey has made an app, The Drinks Meter, to help people keep an eye on how much they are drinking, as well as publishing guidelines for safer drug use at saferuselimits.co.

Researchers also looked into drug use, with cocaine a focus.

Results show that 30.4% of those who reported using cocaine said delivery took less than 30 minutes — about the same time as a takeaway pizza — while 70% would support a regulated fair-trade cocaine market to reduce harm in producer countries.

Binge drinking expected to rise as alcohol use increases around the world, study says

“A regulated market could possibly even result in benefits for both the public purse and the health and well-being of populations — both those who use drugs and those who do not,” wrote Winstock in the survey results.

“Lower potency, lower risk cocaine products and smarter education could all be explored.”

Consumption of alcohol is increasingly globally.

Research published in the journal The Lancet earlier in May indicates that between 1990 and 2017, per capita adult alcohol consumption increased by nearly 0.7 liters (about the same in quarts) to 6.5 liters (6.9 quarts) annually around the world.

The number is predicted to reach 7.6 liters (8 quarts) by 2030.

By 2030, half of the world’s adults will drink (up from 45% in 1990), while 40% will abstain (down from 46% in 1990). Additionally, 23% of adults will binge drink at least once a month, compared with just 18.5% who did so in 1990.

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nuno-show.nl

British people get drunk more often than anyone else, survey finds

British people get drunk more often than anyone else, survey finds

British people get drunk more often than anyone else, survey finds

The results of the 2019 Global Drug Survey, published Thursday, revealed that British respondents get drunk more times per year than people from anywhere else.

Adam Winstock, an addiction psychiatrist and founder of the Global Drug Survey, told CNN that British respondents are drinking too much, too often, regarding getting drunk as the point of a night out as opposed to enhancing the evening.

“We have never grasped moderation — it’s not part of our culture or conversation,” he said. “We need to learn that more fun with better health and fatter wallets can follow from a bit less, a bit less often.”

And drinkers around the world should consider cutting down to benefit their health, said Winstock.

“Deaths due to alcoholic liver disease and cancer due to excessive alcohol consumption are on the rise along with obesity and poorer mental health,” he said. “Drinking too much makes all these worse — drinking less make them better.”

Researchers spoke to 123,814 people from more than 30 countries in preparing the report, and they found that people on average had got drunk 33 times in the past 12 months

Results reflect the number of times that survey respondents said they got drunk, rather than the amount of alcohol consumed.

Those from English-speaking countries got drunk most often, according to the report, while participants from South American countries got drunk on the lowest number of occasions.

UK respondents said they got drunk 51 times in the past year, compared with 50 times in the US, 48 in Canada and 47 in Australia.

Chilean respondents, on the other hand, reported getting drunk just 16 times a year, and Colombians 22 times.

Some 38% of survey participants said they wanted to drink less in the next year.

The Global Drug Survey has made an app, The Drinks Meter, to help people keep an eye on how much they are drinking, as well as publishing guidelines for safer drug use at saferuselimits.co.

Researchers also looked into drug use, with cocaine a focus.

Results show that 30.4% of those who reported using cocaine said delivery took less than 30 minutes — about the same time as a takeaway pizza — while 70% would support a regulated fair-trade cocaine market to reduce harm in producer countries.

Binge drinking expected to rise as alcohol use increases around the world, study says

“A regulated market could possibly even result in benefits for both the public purse and the health and well-being of populations — both those who use drugs and those who do not,” wrote Winstock in the survey results.

“Lower potency, lower risk cocaine products and smarter education could all be explored.”

Consumption of alcohol is increasingly globally.

Research published in the journal The Lancet earlier in May indicates that between 1990 and 2017, per capita adult alcohol consumption increased by nearly 0.7 liters (about the same in quarts) to 6.5 liters (6.9 quarts) annually around the world.

The number is predicted to reach 7.6 liters (8 quarts) by 2030.

By 2030, half of the world’s adults will drink (up from 45% in 1990), while 40% will abstain (down from 46% in 1990). Additionally, 23% of adults will binge drink at least once a month, compared with just 18.5% who did so in 1990.

Source link

nuno-show.nl

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