Jerry Nadler feels the heat on impeachment from Democrats

Jerry Nadler feels the heat on impeachment from Democrats

Jerry Nadler feels the heat on impeachment from Democrats

The discussions boiled over in a series of tense meetings Monday night, with Nadler ultimately siding with Pelosi, a California Democrat. But Nadler told Democrats on his panel he was sympathetic to their calls to open up a formal impeachment investigation, something that Pelosi rejected in the private meetings.

Still Democrats say Nadler will not buck Pelosi, and would only move forward with an impeachment inquiry if she were on board.

“He’s in a very difficult position,” said Rep. Steve Cohen, a Tennessee Democrat on the committee who has pressed for opening an impeachment inquiry.

“I believe we are going to be left with — and probably right now are left with — nothing but that we must open an inquiry,” said Democratic Rep. Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania, another Judiciary Committee member.

Behind the scenes, the calls for begin an official impeachment inquiry are louder than ever, with members arguing that the pitch from the speaker to focus on congressional investigations has grown almost impossible in the wake of the Trump administration’s blanket blockade on their oversight.
How long can Nancy Pelosi hold off impeachment?
So far, Nadler has resisted calls to begin impeachment proceedings, arguing that the committee has to first conduct its broad investigation into the President and his administration before determining whether such a step is necessary. But the tide among rank-and-file committee members has shifted in recent days, as more and more Democrats on the panel are publicly declaring that beginning an impeachment inquiry is a necessary response to the President’s stonewalling.

“After so many accommodations that we’ve made, accommodation after accommodation, I don’t think that we should wait any longer,” said Rep. Veronica Escobar, a Democrat from Texas who’s a member of the Judiciary Committee.

“I am,” Escobar added when asked whether she was concerned about Pelosi’s and Nadler’s more cautious approach. “I understand why they’re not there yet, and I understand that there are still paths we have not gone down that are areas of opportunity. But I’m there.”

“No one is prejudging the outcome, but a number of us are convinced that an impeachment inquiry would make sense,” Rep. Jamie Raskin, a Maryland Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, told CNN. “It’s not the only way to go and obviously we want to proceed with the rest of the caucus in a way that makes sense for Congress.”

‘We’ll have to consider that and all alternatives’

Asked by CNN’s Chris Cuomo on Monday if the White House’s resistance made him more likely to turn to impeachment, Nadler said the stonewalling was making it “more and more difficult to ignore all alternatives, including impeachment.”

“And we’ll have to consider that and all alternatives,” Nadler said.

Democratic leaders have at times been candid about the political realities they are weighing between Democrats wanting to move on impeachment and the political cost of such action.

“I don’t, probably, think there’s any Democrat who probably wouldn’t in their gut say, ‘You know, he’s done some things that probably justify impeachment,’ ” said House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, a Maryland Democrat, on Tuesday. “Having said that — this is the important point — I think the majority of Democrats continue to believe that we need to continue to pursue the avenue that we’ve been on in trying to elicit information, testimony, review the Mueller report, review other items. … If the facts lead us to a broader action, so be it.”

Republicans on the committee have accused Democrats of trying to make it appear as though they are conducting impeachment proceedings without actually taking that step. And Pelosi has suggested that the President is trying to goad Democrats into beginning impeachment proceedings — which could be a boost to his re-election chances by rallying his base against impeachment.
Pelosi says Trump 'every day gives grounds for impeachment'
The White House’s posture has been one of resistance in the face of an onslaught of Democratic probes. Democrats have been forced to take their fight to the courts as they struggle to get information. At the beginning of the month, the House Judiciary Committee voted to hold Barr in contempt of Congress for refusing to turn over the full, unredacted Mueller report and underlying evidence. Last week, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin defied a House Ways and Means Committee subpoena for Trump’s tax information and numerous committees are still awaiting documents they requested months ago on everything from the administration’s handling of immigration to the security clearance process at the White House.

House Democrats will use their Thursday caucus meeting to discuss the status of the committee investigations into the Trump administration.

On Monday night, Nadler — facing questions from members of his committee about opening an impeachment inquiry — talked with Pelosi about the advantages of impeachment in terms of adding weight to the court fights, according to a source familiar with the conversation. Pelosi pointed out to Nadler that they had just won a key court case — a federal district judge told the accounting firm Mazars on Monday that it will need to turn over Trump’s accounting records — and their approach is getting results. She made that same case at another private meeting in which some Democrats pushed her to move ahead with impeachment.

“I asked basically, ‘Why not?'” Cohen recalled of the meeting with Pelosi. “For whatever reason, she doesn’t want to do it. And I think it’s our duty to do it.”

‘I’m getting there’

But some are taking impeachment into their own hands.

Texas Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, a member of the House Judiciary Committee, told reporters Tuesday that in the “next 48 hours” she would be introducing “a resolution of investigation” that will call on the committee to investigate whether there is “sufficient grounds” to move forward with impeachment.

It’s unclear whether the chairman would move on it. So far, he’s resisted similar efforts. But even members who were once reluctant to forge the path of impeachment are now suggesting that the administration’s defiance of their demands could change their approach.

Nancy Pelosi pleads for patience

House Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings told CNN on Tuesday that “I’m getting there” when it comes to supporting an impeachment inquiry. The Maryland Democrat said the White House strategy is making Democrats “powerless” and is basically “tying their hands.”

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, a California Democrat who had been skeptical of impeachment and is closely aligned with leadership, told CNN Tuesday that the “case gets stronger the more they stonewall.”

Cummings also, however, touted the court decision Monday that Mazars must turn over the Trump financial records and said he believes it will propel other courts to comply with their demands.

“They want to see our democracy survive,” he said of the courts. He added it is a “long-shot remedy” as Trump continues to appeal the decision.

Others who are not on the Judiciary Committee are also beginning to see impeachment as a logical next step.

“I was not in favor of some of the earlier efforts around impeachment,” said Rep. Dan Kildee, a Michigan Democrat. “I thought they were not only premature but counterproductive so we should be reluctant, but that doesn’t mean under no circumstance should we ever consider this. The President is creating the circumstances and we have to consider it. I personally am much more open to it now then I was a couple of months ago.”

Source link

nuno-show.nl

‘House of Cards’ actress Sakina Jaffrey feels ‘100% New Yorker’

‘House of Cards’ actress Sakina Jaffrey feels ‘100% New Yorker’

‘House of Cards’ actress Sakina Jaffrey feels ‘100% New Yorker’

Sakina Jaffrey comes from a family of trailblazers.

Her mother helped introduce Indian cuisine to the West, her late father was a high-profile actor and her adoptive father was the first African-American musician in the New York Philharmonic.

“I believe that you can make anything happen,” says the actress, who played White House Chief of Staff Linda Vasquez in the “House of Cards” TV series. “That’s their gift to me.”

Her mother, Madhur Jaffrey, was born in India’s capital New Delhi and her father, Saeed Jaffrey, hailed from Malerkotla in the northern state of Punjab. Jaffrey learned about the history of India through her mother, as “no Indian history is taught here (in the United States).”

Her mother, born in the 1930s, was an involuntary witness to the deadly period of partition in August 1947, when departing British rulers divided India to create the Muslim nation of Pakistan. “I remember it just being particularly brutal and upsetting to her because she had lots of Muslim friends. And one day, they were gone.”

‘My mother was a caged bird’

Jaffrey’s parents met in India and began acting there, before her mother moved to London to join the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. “I always think of my mother as being a caged bird, needing to fly out and do exactly what she wanted.”

She then joined Jaffrey’s father who had moved to the US to pursue his own acting ambitions. They got married and eventually settled in Manhattan in the late 1950s.

“There really wasn’t work at the time,” says Jaffrey, 57. Her parents worked odd jobs before they divorced when she was two years old.

Her mother, Madhur, shifted from acting to hosting cookery TV programs and later became an authority on Indian cuisine in the US.

Her father, Saeed, moved to England where job prospects were better for Indian actors.

With roles across British radio, film and television, he became a household name and was the first Asian actor to be made a member of the Order of the British Empire (OBE).

“Because of colonial rule, so many Indians were there. They were way ahead of us (in the US) in terms of understanding Indians.”

Saeed Jaffrey passed away in November 2015 from a brain haemorrhage in London.

‘We wouldn’t see Indians on the street’

Growing up in Manhattan, Jaffrey had far from a typical Indian upbringing. “When I was five, my mother remarried, my stepfather (Sanford Allen, now her adoptive father) is black. I grew up in this black Indian household and with black Indian relatives.”

Her adoptive father made his mark in the New York Philharmonic and remained the “only one (African American musician) till he left after 15 years.”

Sakina Jaffrey with her adoptive father, violinist Sanford Allen, in Kashmir.

Seeing other Indians was always a pleasant surprise. “In the 1960s, my sisters and I would never see an Indian on the street. And when we did, we ran towards them saying, ‘Oh my God, hello!'”

Sakina, who learned ballet at around age four, attended an empowering private girls’ school “that was trying to produce leaders.” At 15, she decided that acting was the career for her and two years later made her debut in Wallace Shawn’s 1979 play “Marie and Bruce”at The Public Theater in New York.

Sakina Jaffrey attends the annual Iftar dinner celebrating the Muslim holy month of Ramadan hosted by ex-US President Barack Obama in the White House on July 22, 2015 in Washington, DC.

While she scored only small parts in the first 15 years of her career, the work kept coming. And when she played the highest-ranking woman in a president’s inner circle in the “House of Cards,” it didn’t faze her.

“I read as much as I could about anybody who’d been chief of staff. I watched videos of businesswomen, leaders in politics, just to see how they presented themselves.

“She had to be smarter than everybody in that room. And her power came from her mind. So I had to fully know what the heck I was saying.”

Her fellow cast members also motivated her.

“Kevin (Spacey) would just eat you alive if you weren’t prepared. He didn’t suffer fools. I knew I had to bring it, in order to be in the same room with him.”

Mindy Kaling as Mindy Lahiri, Sakina Jaffrey as Sonu Lahiri in the US TV series "The Mindy Project".

The actress has also starred in the TV series “The Mindy Project” and “Homeland,” among others.

She says there are signs of progress for actors of Indian origin in Hollywood — some younger actors are now being cast in lead roles. But to see more people of Indian origin in Hollywood, she believes there needs to be more Indian writers.

“There aren’t enough Indians telling those stories (about Indians), because right now we’re at a point where people want those stories.

“I think it’s getting so much better. But the simple answer is the writers room.”

But prejudices also exist in everyday life. “If I stand by a cappuccino station too long, somebody will give me their empty cup… That happened just a few weeks ago in Miami… Or I’ll come to a door or be at somebody’s house, and they’ll think I’m the nanny or something. It exists all the time, just based on how you look.”

But she believes, over the years, perceptions have changed. “At least now, people know other Indians. There are Indians who are key people in business, justice, and stars on TV, too. All that has had a profound impact.”

When she visits India, she “feels a sense of family.” But New York has influenced how she sees herself. “I can’t say I feel 100% Indian or 100% American; I always feel 100% a New Yorker.”

Living in a town on the Hudson River in New York with her husband, journalist Francis Wilkinson, and a Great Dane called Biggie Smalls, Jaffrey describes her two grownup children as her greatest achievement.

She focused on her acting only once they were older.

“I’ve been very lucky that I’ve been able to be home with them and raise them, but also do acting projects every year, that didn’t take me away from them for too long.

“Once they got to an age when they really didn’t want me around, I got very busy.”

Sometimes, people are surprised that she’s managed to have a successful career while also raising children.

“I don’t really think women can have it all. But I do think you can get what you need. My mother and father (Allen) have made me think that.”

Source link

nuno-show.nl

‘House of Cards’ actress Sakina Jaffrey feels ‘100% New Yorker’

‘House of Cards’ actress Sakina Jaffrey feels ‘100% New Yorker’

‘House of Cards’ actress Sakina Jaffrey feels ‘100% New Yorker’

Sakina Jaffrey comes from a family of trailblazers.

Her mother helped introduce Indian cuisine to the West, her late father was a high-profile actor and her adoptive father was the first African-American musician in the New York Philharmonic.

“I believe that you can make anything happen,” says the actress, who played White House Chief of Staff Linda Vasquez in the “House of Cards” TV series. “That’s their gift to me.”

Her mother, Madhur Jaffrey, was born in India’s capital New Delhi and her father, Saeed Jaffrey, hailed from Malerkotla in the northern state of Punjab. Jaffrey learned about the history of India through her mother, as “no Indian history is taught here (in the United States).”

Her mother, born in the 1930s, was an involuntary witness to the deadly period of partition in August 1947, when departing British rulers divided India to create the Muslim nation of Pakistan. “I remember it just being particularly brutal and upsetting to her because she had lots of Muslim friends. And one day, they were gone.”

‘My mother was a caged bird’

Jaffrey’s parents met in India and began acting there, before her mother moved to London to join the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. “I always think of my mother as being a caged bird, needing to fly out and do exactly what she wanted.”

She then joined Jaffrey’s father who had moved to the US to pursue his own acting ambitions. They got married and eventually settled in Manhattan in the late 1950s.

“There really wasn’t work at the time,” says Jaffrey, 57. Her parents worked odd jobs before they divorced when she was two years old.

Her mother, Madhur, shifted from acting to hosting cookery TV programs and later became an authority on Indian cuisine in the US.

Her father, Saeed, moved to England where job prospects were better for Indian actors.

With roles across British radio, film and television, he became a household name and was the first Asian actor to be made a member of the Order of the British Empire (OBE).

“Because of colonial rule, so many Indians were there. They were way ahead of us (in the US) in terms of understanding Indians.”

Saeed Jaffrey passed away in November 2015 from a brain haemorrhage in London.

‘We wouldn’t see Indians on the street’

Growing up in Manhattan, Jaffrey had far from a typical Indian upbringing. “When I was five, my mother remarried, my stepfather (Sanford Allen, now her adoptive father) is black. I grew up in this black Indian household and with black Indian relatives.”

Her adoptive father made his mark in the New York Philharmonic and remained the “only one (African American musician) till he left after 15 years.”

Sakina Jaffrey with her adoptive father, violinist Sanford Allen, in Kashmir.

Seeing other Indians was always a pleasant surprise. “In the 1960s, my sisters and I would never see an Indian on the street. And when we did, we ran towards them saying, ‘Oh my God, hello!'”

Sakina, who learned ballet at around age four, attended an empowering private girls’ school “that was trying to produce leaders.” At 15, she decided that acting was the career for her and two years later made her debut in Wallace Sean’s 1979 play “Marie and Bruce”at The Public Theater in New York.

Sakina Jaffrey attends the annual Iftar dinner celebrating the Muslim holy month of Ramadan hosted by ex-US President Barack Obama in the White House on July 22, 2015 in Washington, DC.

While she scored only small parts in the first 15 years of her career, the work kept coming. And when she played the highest-ranking woman in a president’s inner circle in the “House of Cards,” it didn’t faze her.

“I read as much as I could about anybody who’d been chief of staff. I watched videos of businesswomen, leaders in politics, just to see how they presented themselves.

“She had to be smarter than everybody in that room. And her power came from her mind. So I had to fully know what the heck I was saying.”

Her fellow cast members also motivated her.

“Kevin (Spacey) would just eat you alive if you weren’t prepared. He didn’t suffer fools. I knew I had to bring it, in order to be in the same room with him.”

Mindy Kaling as Mindy Lahiri, Sakina Jaffrey as Sonu Lahiri in the US TV series "The Mindy Project".

The actress has also starred in the TV series “The Mindy Project” and “Homeland,” among others.

She says there are signs of progress for actors of Indian origin in Hollywood — some younger actors are now being cast in lead roles. But to see more people of Indian origin in Hollywood, she believes there needs to be more Indian writers.

“There aren’t enough Indians telling those stories (about Indians), because right now we’re at a point where people want those stories.

“I think it’s getting so much better. But the simple answer is the writers room.”

But prejudices also exist in everyday life. “If I stand by a cappuccino station too long, somebody will give me their empty cup… That happened just a few weeks ago in Miami… Or I’ll come to a door or be at somebody’s house, and they’ll think I’m the nanny or something. It exists all the time, just based on how you look.”

But she believes, over the years, perceptions have changed. “At least now, people know other Indians. There are Indians who are key people in business, justice, and stars on TV, too. All that has had a profound impact.”

When she visits India, she “feels a sense of family.” But New York has influenced how she sees herself. “I can’t say I feel 100% Indian or 100% American; I always feel 100% a New Yorker.”

Living in a town on the Hudson River in New York with her husband, journalist Francis Wilkinson, and a Great Dane called Biggie Smalls, Jaffrey describes her two grownup children as her greatest achievement.

She focused on her acting only once they were older.

“I’ve been very lucky that I’ve been able to be home with them and raise them, but also do acting projects every year, that didn’t take me away from them for too long.

“Once they got to an age when they really didn’t want me around, I got very busy.”

Sometimes, people are surprised that she’s managed to have a successful career while also raising children.

“I don’t really think women can have it all. But I do think you can get what you need. My mother and father (Allen) have made me think that.”

Source link

nuno-show.nl

Why Donald Trump feels betrayed by Fox News

Why Donald Trump feels betrayed by Fox News

Why Donald Trump feels betrayed by Fox News

A close read of Donald Trump’s Twitter feed over the last few weeks reveals that the President has grown increasingly frustrated with Fox News’ decision to give air time to several of the Democratic candidates seeking to oust him in 2020.

“So weird to watch Crazy Bernie on @FoxNews. Not surprisingly, @BretBaier and the ‘audience’ was so smiley and nice. Very strange, and now we have @donnabrazile?”

That “we” in the tweet above is very, very important when it comes to understanding how Trump views Fox News — and why he is lashing out at the network now.

In Trump’s mind, Fox News is the media arm of his White House — and his reelection campaign. They help signal boost his preferred message to the masses of conservatives who watch. And, when necessary, they help distract or deflect when the broader news cycle is less friendly for Trump.

(Nota bene: There is a group of journalists — Bret Baier, Chris Wallace and Shepard Smith jump to mind — on Fox News who shouldn’t be lumped into this pro-Trump category. They shoot straight.)

It has been a mutually beneficial relationship.

Trump has quite clearly benefited from Fox News’ championing — not to mention its near-monopoly among conservative TV viewers. (One academic study written up recently in Vox suggested that the existence of Fox News could add more than three points to the support of a Republican presidential candidate.)
Don't fool yourself: No Republicans will line up behind Justin Amash on impeachment
And Fox News has reaped the rewards of being the President’s preferred network. He has granted more than 40 interviews to Fox News (and another 10+ to Fox Business Network), according to calculations by The Washington Post. The Fox News number alone is more interviews than Trump has given to ABC, CBS, NBC, MSNBC and CNN combined during his presidency.

Those appearances by Trump — and the slew of tweets touting the ratings of his favorite Fox News shows — are only part of the symbiosis between the President and the network. Perhaps the most telling sign of how closely the two are aligned is the staff pipeline between FNC and the Trump White House.

According to a Business Insider tally, at least 19 people have either worked for (or are working for) Fox News that have also worked in the White House.

And these are not low-level staffers. Bill Shine, a former co-president of Fox News Channel, served as the de facto communications director at the White House. One-time Fox News anchor Heather Nauert served a stint as the lead spokesperson for the State Department. And she was replaced in that job by Morgan Ortagus, who was — you guessed it! — a Fox News contributor.

The pipeline works the other way, too. Hope Hicks, the former White House communications director and a close confidant of the President, is now the chief communications officer at Fox News’ parent company.

(Yes, there has always been some amount of shuttling between cable TV networks and past administrations– Democrat and Republican. But we have NEVER seen anything to this level before.)

Given all of that, you can understand why Trump gets so exercised when he sees the likes of Buttigieg or Bernie on “his” airwaves. He sees no real difference in his world between Fox News and the Republican National Committee — and he certainly wouldn’t tolerate the RNC putting out favorable press releases (or TV commercials) about the Democrats who are trying to beat him.

Betrayal is most deeply felt when it is by someone you believed to be on your side (paging Daenerys Targaryen). And that’s what Trump is evincing of late. He views Fox News’ Democratic town halls as an “et tu, Brutus” situation. Which is, you would think, ridiculous.

Except, not really. This is the bargain Fox News agreed to — whether knowingly or not — when it decided that the way to cover Trump was glowingly at (almost) all times. It got ratings beyond belief. But it also locked the network into lockstep with a President who fundamentally misunderstands the role of a free and independent media.

In other words: You reap what you sow.

Source link

nuno-show.nl

Rural America feels the sting of Trump’s China trade war

Rural America feels the sting of Trump’s China trade war

Rural America feels the sting of Trump’s China trade war

Both Walmart and Macy’s say they might need to raise prices if Trump goes ahead with expanding tariffs to cover almost everything China exports to the US, from toys to clothes and hardware.

Telecom companies in rural areas may face increased costs or network disruptions if they are unable to buy the gear they need from Chinese suppliers — and that could affect customers who depend on those connections.

“Farmers, ranchers, small businesses in rural America, the people who support those businesses in rural America — your teachers, all that,” said Carri Bennet, the general counsel for the Rural Wireless Association, a trade group representing rural telecom companies. “Our members are in small, little communities mainly of under 10,000 people … It doesn’t help them. It ends up hurting them.”

Concerns about higher costs stem from the fact that many small and rural telecom providers rely on low-cost transmitters and receivers made by Huawei, the world’s largest supplier of telecom equipment. Larger carriers such as Verizon and AT&T do not use Huawei equipment. (AT&T is the owner of CNN’s parent company WarnerMedia.)

Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday barring the use of telecom gear from sources deemed to be a national security risk. While the order did not mention Huawei or China by name, the administration moved quickly to place Huawei on a Commerce Department trading blacklist minutes after Trump signed the order, all but ensuring it will be covered by the administration’s new rules.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Thursday on Fox Business that the administration is willing to work with small and rural carriers to ensure they will not be forced to “rip everything out” that is made by Huawei under the order. And White House officials have said they will be taking input from businesses about how to structure the implementation of the new rules.

But being unable to purchase new Huawei gear could still leave those carriers stuck with aging infrastructure that can’t be replaced if it malfunctions, degrades or is destroyed by the weather, said Bennet.

“You wouldn’t be able to make a 911 call if the network is down,” she said, particularly in rural areas where bigger carriers don’t offer any service at all.

The complications surrounding the executive order reflect how a number Trump’s initiatives have led to unintended consequences.

Farmers have already been struggling to adapt to Chinese tariffs on US soybeans, corn and wheat.

“Farmers were base,” John Wesley Boyd Jr., a Virginia-based soybean farmer, told CNN’s Brianna Keilar in a recent interview. “They helped elect this President … and now he’s turning his back on America’s farmers when we need him the most.”

Trump offered subsidies last year and has said he will push to expand those payments to help farmers out until a trade deal is reached.

But the impact of Trump’s latest escalations go beyond just agriculture.

About 2.1 million workers in aircraft manufacturing, beer brewing, tobacco and dozens of other industries stand to be affected by the trade war, according to an April study by the Brookings Institution. The impact would be evenly distributed between red and blue counties, Brookings found.

But a similar study by Axios last week found that Trump’s recent escalations could wind up affecting more than five times as many workers. The hardest hits will affect industries based in “rural, deeply red, already-struggling parts of the country,” including miners in Texas, furniture makers in North Carolina and sawmills in Alabama.

In the tech industry, as many as 1 million jobs are at risk due to the trade war in states such as Texas, Florida, Illinois and Pennsylvania, according to the Consumer Technology Association.

And, the CTA said, the trade war has forced US businesses to pay nearly $750 million in tariffs for products related to 5G, the mobile data technology the US says is key to economic development.

As a result, American businesses are paying more for infrastructure even as Trump prepares to meet with Democratic leaders next week to discuss funding for a $2 trillion infrastructure proposal.

CNN’s Katie Lobosco contributed to this report.

Source link

nuno-show.nl

error: Content is protected !!

This Area is Widget-Ready

You can place here any widget you want!

You can also display any layout saved in Divi Library.

Let’s try with contact form: